The 2015 Arthur C. Clarke Award : “Station Eleven” by the canadian writer Emily St. John Mandel

Arthur C. Clarke Award 2015 winner

Station Eleven Emily St. John Mandel

2015 Arthur C. Clarke Award Winner
2015 PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist
2014 National Book Award Fiction Finalist
Longlisted for the 2015 Women’s Prize for Fiction

The winner of the Arthur C.Clarke Award for best science fiction novel published in 2014 is “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel (Canada).

The nominated novels were :

“Memory Of Water” byEmmi Itäranta (Finland)

“The Book Of Strange New Things”  Michel Faber (Australia/Scotland)

“The Girl With All The Gifts”  by M.R. Carey (UK)

The First Fifteen Lives Of Harry August” by Claire North (pen name of Catherine Webb, UK)

“Europe in Autumn” by Dave Hutchinson (UK)

Duncan Lawie and Nicholas Whyte were this year’s judges for the British Science Fiction Association, Sarah Brown and Lesley Hall (Science Fiction Foundation), Leila Abu El Hawa (SCI-FI-LONDON), Andrew M. Butler was chair of judges, Tom Hunter was awards director.

Emily St. John Mandel received a £2015 prize and a commemorative engraved bookend during the award ceremony (May 6, 2015) held at Foyles Bookshop, London, as part of the lead-up to the SCI-FI-LONDON Film Festival.

Emily St. John Mandel was born in 1979 in British Columbia, Canada. She studied contemporary dance at The School of Toronto Dance Theatre and lived briefly in Montreal before relocating to New York. She is the author of three previous novels—Last Night in Montreal, The Singer’s Gun, and The Lola Quartet—all of which were Indie Next picks. She is a staff writer for The Millions, and her work has appeared in numerous anthologies, including The Best American Mystery Stories 2013 and Venice Noir. She lives in New York City with her husband.

 Her fourth novel, “Station Eleven” is a dystopia set in the near future in a world ravaged by the effects of a virus and follows a troupe of Shakespearian actors who travel from town to town around the Great Lakes region. It was nominated for the National Book Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction and the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction and won the Arthur C. Clarke Award. A film adaptation of the novel is currently in development by producer Scott Steindorff.

www.emilymandel.com

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